Ankle to brachial systolic pressure index at rest increases with age in asymptomatic physically active participants

TitreAnkle to brachial systolic pressure index at rest increases with age in asymptomatic physically active participants
Type de publicationArticle de revue
Année de publication2015
Titre de la revueBMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine
Titre de la série/collection1
Volume1
Paginatione000081
Date de publication2015/11/01/
Auteur(s)Congnard, F., Abraham P., Vincent F., Le Tourneau T., Carre F., Hupin D., Hamel J. François, Vielle B. et Bruneau A.
Numéro ISBN2055-7647
Mots-clésCardiovascular, Exercise, Physical activity
Résumé

Background It is commonly acknowledged that the ability to use the ankle–brachial index (ABI), a reliable way to diagnose atherosclerosis, decreases with age in the general population. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between resting ABI and age in different populations.Methods 674 physically active participants with (active high risk, ACTHR) or without (active low risk, ACTLR) cardiovascular risk factors or/and sedentary (SED) subjects, aged 20–70 years. Systolic arterial pressure was recorded at rest and simultaneously with automatic sphygmomanometers at the arms and ankles. ABI was calculated as the ratio of the lowest, highest or mean ankle pressure to the highest arm pressure.Results Proportion of ABImin<0.90 was 10.3% in SEDHR subjects versus 0.5% and 1.2%, respectively, in ACTHR and ACTLR groups. The averaged ABI value of each group was in the normal range in all groups (ABI>0.90) but was significantly lower in SEDHR compared with all active participants (p<0.001). Regression lines from ABImean versus age could lead to approximately +0.05 every 15 years of age in apparently healthy active participants (ACTLR).Conclusion ABI at rest increases with the increase in age in the groups of low-risk asymptomatic middle-aged trained adults. The previously reported decrease in ABI with age is found only in SEDHR subjects, and is very likely to rely on the increased prevalence of asymptomatic arterial disease in this group. The increase of ABI with age is consistent with the ‘physiological’ stiffness observed in ageing arteries even in the absence of ‘pathological’ atherosclerotic lesions.Trial registration number NIH clinicaltrial.gov: NCT01812343.

URLhttps://bmjopensem.bmj.com/content/1/1/e000081